Products

Spey Line Breakdown

Below is a short explanation of spey lines. Beulah is currently making two lines; a Scandinavian style spey/switch taper (The "Elixir") and a Skagit style spey/switch taper (The "Tonic"). These two lines are made to be cast on two handed rods; switch and spey. This system is extremely versatile for spey casting while swinging a variety of flies and tips in any moving water. Although not intended to be cast overhead, both head systems can be applied with single hand spey and and overhead delivery. Scandinavian Spey Line (a.k.a. "Scandi") tapers were developed for the swifter, brushier rivers of Scandinavia. This is the Ferrari of spey lines: accurate and fun. Their shorter head length allows the caster to make spey casts in tight situations (smaller "D" loop) while still being able to achieve long casts.

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Uses: Summer Steelheading, Atlantic Salmon Fishing, Sea Run Brown Fishing, Trout Fishing in Streams

Benefits:

  • Smaller "D" loop allows for distance casting with minimal back casting space.
  • Can cast light sinking tips and excels with floating tips.
  • Made in floating and sinking heads.
  • Less difficult to cast than the Long Belly Spey Line
  • Forms bullet shaped loops.

Pitfalls:

  • Requires stripping/shooting of running line.
  • Because the head is short with thin running line attached, mending is difficult.
  • Difficult to turn over large or heavy flies.
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Skagit Style Spey Lines Skagit Style Spey Lines (pronounced Ska’jet) are the youngest of all the spey heads. These heads were born in the Pacific Northwest to be cast on lightly weighted rods (5-8 weight) for steelhead. Skagit Lines will cast heavy, long sinking tips with heavily weighted flies. This is the truck of spey lines; delivers large packages to their destination.

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Uses: Summer/Winter Steelhead Fishing, Pacific Salmon Fishing, Trout Fishing in Streams, Sea Run Brown Fishing, Taimen Fishing, Sea Run Cutthroat Fishing, Golden Dorado Fishing, Surf Casting

Benefits:

  • Smaller "D" loop for tight casting situations.
  • Casts a variety of tips; floating tips to very dense sink tips.
  • Small or large flies; weighted and un-weighted.
  • Easy for inexperienced casters to use.

Pitfalls:

  • Requires stripping/shooting line
  • Because the head is short with thin running line attached, mending is difficult.
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Long Belly Spey Lines Long Belly Spey Line tapers are the most traditional option for spey casting. The Rolls Royce of spey lines; smooth and elegant. Originally developed in Scotland to maximize casting distance and line control in order to cover as much of the holding water within a "beat" as possible. Very efficient casting style; the long length of the line allows for consistent long casts without having to strip/shoot a wad of line.

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Uses: Spey Casting Distance Competition, Atlantic Salmon Fishing, Summer Steelhead

Benefits:

  • Minimal to no stripping between casts
  • Excellent way to cover large river systems
  • Excel with floating mono-filament leaders of varying lengths coupled with skaters and non-weighted wet flies.

Pitfalls:

  • Longer learning curve to master Long Belly Lines
  • Need more casting room behind the caster as longer lines require larger "D" loops
  • Poor casting capability for sinking leaders or sink tips and or larger/heavier flies
  • Difficult to cast in heavy wind
  • Can only be used on long spey rods, typically 15 feet or longer.

Mid Belly Spey Line This line can cast reasonably heavy flies and tips while not sacrificing distance. Shorter than the Long Belly spey line, the Mid Belly requires less backcasting space and requires less shooting/stripping than the Skandi Spey Line.

Benefits:

  • Great distance potential
  • Requires less backcasting space than the long belly spey line.
  • Less stripping/shooting than the Skandi or Skagit.
  • Can cast/turn over reasonably heavy tips and flies.
  • Great dry line fishing application.

Pitfalls:

  • More difficult to cast than the Skandi or Skagit.
  • Can’t handle the heavy payload like a Skagit.
  • Needs more backcasting space than the Skandi or Skagit.
  • Difficult to cast in heavy wind
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Weight Forward Taper Most commonly used on single hand rods, when over weighted (ie. casting an 8 weight line on a 5 weight rod) can be a useful nymphing line for switch rods. Not the best line for spey casting, but can be used for light duty swinging. When using on switch rods it is necessary to use a line that is two to four weights heavier than the rod’s line weight.

Benefits:

  • Two handed nymphing.
  • Light presentation for dry fly fishing.
  • Two handed overhead casting
  • Czech Nymphing

Pitfalls:

  • Not the greatest two handed casting line.
  • Cannot cast sinking tips or big, heavy flies (larger than 1/0)
  • Less distance capability than the other lines above.
  • Can be difficult to find a weight forward line heavy enough to load heavy weight rods.
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